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  Volume 14, # 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . January, 1999

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Plant these "seeds" well and water often. Enjoy!


On Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abigail Adams, The Portable Life 101, p.9

"Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence."


Laugh at Fear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peggy Goldtrap, The Joyful Noiseletter, 3/94

"Faith and laughter are Fear's most formidable foes. Laughter cuts Fear down to size. Fear takes itself so seriously, but it shrinks when we laugh in its face. Poke fun at Fear and it goes into a frenzy.

Why not resolve in this new year to laugh at fear."


Essential Part of Living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harold Taylor

"Unless we give part of ourselves away, unless we can live with other people and understand them and help them, we are missing the most essential part of our own human lives."


Leaders are Visionaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Leadership, 7/2/96, p.4

"The greatest leaders are pioneers–visionaries with the courage to demand the impossible from themselves and others in order to realize their bold visions. They challenge people to look beyond perceived limitations and imagine things as they could be–to take the impossible and not only make it possible, but also to make it a practical reality."


Friend or Acquaintance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bob Edwards

"The difference between a friend and an acquaintance is that a friend helps; an acquaintance merely advises."


A Positive Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Martin Luther King, Jr.

"If you want to move people, it has to be toward a vision that's positive for them, that taps important values, that gets them something they desire, and it has to be presented in a compelling way that they feel inspired to follow."

Only a Bit of Praise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jerome P. Fleishman, via INSPIRE

"Most of us, swimming against the tides of trouble the world knows nothing about, need only a bit of praise or encouragement–and we will make the goal."


Fools May Be Known . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arabian proverb

A fool may be known by six things:

  • anger, without cause;
  • speech, without profit;
  • change, without progress;
  • inquiry without object;
  • putting trust in a stranger, and
  • mistaking foes for friends."

The Light of Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Heraclitus

"The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the full light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you think, and what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny…it is the light that guides your way."


My Business… . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Robert Browning

"My business is not to remake myself,
but make the absolute best of what God made."


Be Unselfish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charles W. Eliot

"Be unselfish. That is the first and final commandment for those who would be useful and happy in their usefulness. If you think of yourself only you cannot develop because you are choking the source of development, which is spiritual expansion through thought for others."


This New Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ralph Waldo Emerson

"Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. He is rich who owns the day, and no one owns the day who allows it to be invaded with fret and anxiety.

Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities, no doubt crept in. Forget them as soon as you can, tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely with too high a spirit to be cumbered with your old nonsense.

This new day is too dear, with its hopes and invitations, to waste a moment on the yesterdays."


Wisdom Seeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . William Arthur Ward

"We can choose to go through the day with hopelessness and cynicism, or to grow through the day with cheerfulness and enthusiasm."


Way We See Reality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. Robert Anthony, SUCCESS WORKSHOP, Vol. 1, # 6

"It is a demonstrated fact of life that you and I do not behave in accordance with the reality of what we can do, but in accordance with the reality of what we believe we can do. It stands to reason that if we change the way we believe, we can change the way we act."


Keeping a Journal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thomas Merton

"Keeping a journal has taught me that there is not so much new in your life as you sometimes think. When you re-read your journal you find out that your latest discovery is something you already found out five years ago. Still, it is true that one penetrates deeper and deeper into the same ideas and the same experiences."


What's Most Important . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Humphrey Bogart


Legend of the Horseshoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Panati's Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things, p. 4

"Legend credits St. Dunstan with having given the horseshoe, hung above a house door, special power against evil.

According to tradition, Dunstan, a blacksmith by trade who would become Archbishop of Canterbury in A.D. 959, was approached one day by a man who asked that horseshoes be attached to his own feet, suspiciously cloven. Dunstan immediately recognized the customer as Satan and explained that to perform the service he would have to shackle the man to the wall. The saint deliberately made the job so excruciatingly painful that the bound devil repeatedly begged for mercy. Dunstan refused to release him until he gave his solemn oath never to enter a house where a horseshoe was displayed above the door.

From the birth of that tale in the 10th century, Christians held the horseshoe in high esteem, placing it first above a doorframe and later moving it down to middoor, where it served the dual function of talisman and door knocker. Hence the origin of the horseshoe-shaped knocker.…The horseshoe could not be hung just any way. It had to be positioned with points upward, lest its luck run out.

Christians once celebrated St. Dunstan's feast day, May 19, with games of horseshoes.…A popular Irish incantation against evil and illness (originating with the St. Dunstan legend) went: ‘Father, Son and Holy Ghost, Nail the devil to a post.'"

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